Special Guest Writer for May Meeting

Maria Leonard Olsen will be a special guest at the Accokeek Women’s Writing Group‘s monthly meeting. The talk and reading are free and open to the public.

WHEN:  May 13, 2019 at 1:15pm

WHERE:  Accokeek Branch Library, 15773 Livingston Rd, Accokeek, MD in the conference room.

Maria is an attorney, a cohost of DC’s “Inside Out” radio show on WPFW fm 89.3, a women’s writing and empowerment-retreat leader and diversity speaker, and a woman who turned fifty expecting to find life less satisfying. But while her children didn’t need her as acutely and many of her other relationships had also changed, by setting out to accomplish fifty specific things, she discovered that the key to a meaningful life was still within her power.

screenshot2018-06-30at9.34.38amFifty Goals

Her chosen goals ranged from physical challenges and travel to lifestyle changes, and the project revitalized her life. As she recounts how she selected and pursued her fifty activities, readers will be inspired to choose their own set of objectives for the next stage of life.

Maria Leonard Olsen’s books will be available for purchase.

 

https://www.facebook.com/events/2632337356807384/

Advertisements

Aging Gracefully? Who Needs It? Check out this inspiring poem by Moyra Donaldson

Who says we can’t write poems that break open cliches about being a woman!? Well, no one really, no one worth listening to. If you are writing about aging, check out this great poem and be inspired to speak freely, and think out of the box!

When I Am Old
by Moyra Donaldson

I’ll have dewlaps and a hump and say what all the time
in a cross voice: on every one of my bony crony fingers
a ring. My lips painted with a slash of bright fuchsia,
I’ll drink margaritas by the tumbler full and if my dealer
dies before I do, I’ll just have to look for younger suppliers.
I can’t imagine not being interested in sex, but if it happens,
so be it, really I could do with a rest, complete hormonelessness.
I may forget who I am and how to find my way home, but be
patient, remember I’ve always been more than a little confused
and never did have much of a sense of direction. If I’m completely
demented, I’m depending on friends: you know who you are.

“When I Am Old” by Moyra Donaldson from Selected Poems. © Liberties Press, 2012.

Wouldn’t you love to read, write here?

Reblogging for all you book and library lovers: Never before seen images of the oldest Bodleian Library reading room. How I’d love to write there, surrounded by history!  Click through to the article for more images. 

Photograph by DAVID ILIFF. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0 Built in 1487, Duke Humfrey’s Library is the oldest reading room in the Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford. Duke Humfrey’s Library is named after Humphrey of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Gloucester, a younger son of Henry IV of England. He was a connoisseur of literature…

via This Reading Room at the University of Oxford is One of the Oldest in Europe — TwistedSifter

Writers, we Hold the Tools of Change

What It Means To Be A Writer In The Time Of Trump

Huffington Post publishes thoughts from 18 writers on the work ahead.

 

Aftermath: Sixteen Writers
on Trump’s America

from the New Yorker magazine.

 

“This is precisely the time that artists go to work.There is no time for despair, no place for self-pity, no need for silence, no room for fear. We speak, we write, we do language. That is how civilizations heal.”

~Toni Morrison

ToniMorrison
More concrete resources: take action on what you feel strongly about – Slate has a great list HERE

how_liberals_can_channel_their_post_election_anxiety_into_action

June’s Meeting report

June’s meeting had lots of ‘news & goods’ as well as two new members. Welcome to Winona and Joyce! Here’s hoping we see more of you and your work.

B07N5X Woman writing a diary or journal at home

Carol Burbank returned from her Canada trip inspired by a writers workshop with author and playwrite Alison Waring. Carol reports progress on multiple writing projects including a new book on education reform for people with disabilites.  She also led us through an exercise to develop our own individual writing prompt for this month. She’s offering various workshops and online courses that you can find out about here.

Cheryl Holloway announced she’s been nominated for two awards online! Cheryl also let us know that she’s offering to be your writing productivity coach. “Write every day and in a year you have your book!” Easier said than done as we all know. You can contact Cheryl here.

New member Teresa is getting a great response to her first ebook and shared some of her marketing strategy with us. She’s interested in more discussions on marketing out self published books. You’ll find her address on the latest email list.

Lyn Scott let us know she’s moving into DC on June 27and invited all to a party at her home Saturday 6/25. She insists she’ll return for meetings, and I hope so!!

Patrise called for volunteers to meet and plan Summer Camp 2.0 or its equivalent. A goodly number of members joined the committee and we’re meeting at the Accokeek Dunkin Donuts at 1pm Monday June 27.

And, the deadline for the Erotic Writing Challenge is extended until July’s meeting. So keep writing, girls!

Remember I am always delighted with submissions for this blog and will help you gain contributor access or post something you send me.  Don’t be shy!

 

March Submission Deadlines: 20 under $20

Check this out — and submit your work!

Women Who Submit

By Lisbeth Coiman

As part of our ongoing effort to encourage women to submit to top tier literary journals, Women Who Submit has put together a monthly submission call round up, hoping women writers find it useful and come back to it again and again. For our first list, we have included 19 publications with under $20 submission fees, and one publication with a slightly higher fee.

General

  1. The Indiana Review

Reading Period: Opening date not listed – March 10

Submission guidelines

What They Like:  They’ve received a ton of stories about cancer, so he could do without seeing any of those for a while and would prefer to see stuff that’s “different.”

  1. James Franco Review

Deadline: March 31

Submission guidelines

Genre: Poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction

Rotating Editors

Blind reading

  1. The Masters Review

Reading Period: January 15 – March 31

Submission guidelines

What They Like: Emerging fiction from new…

View original post 1,051 more words

Unpopular Opinion: Freelancers’ Rhetorical Inconsistency between Paying and Getting Paid for Services

Are you guilty of this contradiction — expecting to be paid, but being reluctant to pay for good services to help you be a better writer? Food for thought….

Contemporary Contempt

Contently’s “The Freelancer” published an article by Yael Grauer today entitled 5 Free Alternatives to Must-Have Freelance Tools. Being relatively new to freelance writing, I read it with great interest, and appreciated Grauer’s helpful breakdown of the pros and cons of various software options. But the underlying conceit of the article (money-saving tips!) is a familiar one, and when contrasted with another common refrain among freelancers (F-you; pay me!), it left me with a nagging feeling that there’s a growing cognitive dissonance that we should address.

While advocating that “freelancing isn’t free,” freelancers as a group persist in searching for free alternatives to the tools critical to doing business. This is characteristic of a prevailing, individualistic attitude among freelancers when it comes to compensation: we’re all looking out for number one and are encouraging each other to do so. This individualism is borne out of necessity. After all, we are…

View original post 989 more words

Embrace Your Ignorance and Just Get Started (again)

Inspiration!

Women Who Submit

by Rachel Sona Reed

The best part about having to repeat Algebra in high school was the amount of class time it gave me to write fiction. I had been doing this since 4th grade, using interstitial moments gained by finishing work early to scribble the stories, scenes, and sentences bubbling up into my consciousness before they spilled out of my brain and evaporated.

Like the tragedy that follows any bout of hubris, these epiphany-fueled, frantic (epi-frantic?) creative outbursts struck less and less, until writing became “something I used to do.” By college, my fiction, much like reading for pleasure, seemed to have officially left my life. My irrepressible urge to write hibernated so I could allocate energy to more intense academic work. Xanga, LiveJournal, and the many blogging platforms that have come since also played a role in redirecting my creativity away from its first love: fiction.

In truth…

View original post 1,628 more words

The Wisdom to Know the Difference: On Rejection, Violence, and Resilience

Check this out — self defense strategies to help us deal with different kinds of rejections, by choosing our response! “It’s up to us as writers to figure out when our writing is rejected because it’s unsettling and when it’s rejected because it’s not up to par. We need to know when to change and when to keep plugging on with submitting until our work finds a home. We need the wisdom to know the difference. Unlike in self-defense, our safety doesn’t depend on this wisdom. But our happiness and our resilience as writers might.”

Women Who Submit

by Jay O’shea

Recently, I was rejected for a fellowship for which I was asked to apply. This isn’t the first time I’ve been invited to put myself forward for an honor of some kind – an award, a job, a publication opportunity – only to receive a rejection. I am aware of this and, yet, every time I receive one of those requests-to-apply emails, the cogs of the fantasy-generating apparatus in my mind start to turn. I reflect on the benefits of the award, publication, or job and how satisfied I would be on receiving it. Each of those rejections sting even as I tell myself that rejection is part of the writing game and that rejection is, as we’ve all heard so many times, a sign that we’re making our best efforts to add our voices to the conversations we long to be part of.

Like many writers…

View original post 1,112 more words